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Sandalwood Essence

Sandalwood Essence

Description

SANDALWOOD (Santalum album)

Family: Santalaceae (sandalwood)

Source: The Essential oil is obtained from the the heartwood.

Fragrance:Heavy, sweet, woody, fruity.

Volatility: Base note

General description and habitat:

Evergreen, semi-parisitic tree; native to southern Asia grows best in South India at heights over 2,000 feet; reaches a height of 50 feet at maturity; an endangered species.

Principal constituents: Santalol.

History

History and folk use:

Best known for its aromatic contribution to the perfume industry.

Mentioned in old Sanskrit and Chinese texts.

Sandalwood was imported into Egypt for medicinal purposes, including embalming and ritual.

In Ayurvedic medicine it is prescribed to: cool down fevers; reduce inflammations, ulcers and abscesses; promote perspiration and to treat mucus discharge.

Properties & Uses

General properties: Diuretic, relaxing , antispasmodic, tonic, astringent, anti-inflammatory, aphrodisiac

Primary Uses:

Abscesses Cracked skin
EczemaGenito-urinary problems
Pneumonia



Secondary Uses:

Acne,Anorexia,
Anxiety,Broken Capillaries,
Catarrh,Colds,
Coughs,Cystitis,
Depression,Diarrhea,
Dry And Chapped Skin,Hoarseness,
Impotence,Insomnia,
Menopause,Nervous Tension,
Urinary Infections,Voice Disorders,
Water Retention.



White sandalwood has approval status by the German Commission E.

Recommended daily dosages in Germany are as follows:

1 - 1.5 g essential oil.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Contraindications

Beware adulteration with castor, palm and linseed oils.

The German Commission E status of red sandalwood is "null" or neutral i.e. while it is not approved, there is no documented risk. There may also be some concern over the claims made by manufacturers i.e. they are unproven.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

 


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