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Blackthorn

Blackthorn

Botanical Description / Habitat

Prunus spinosa (homeopathic)

Family

Rosaceae

Common Names

Blackthorn fruit
Sloe berry
Wild Plum

Habitat

It is most accessible as a common hedging material in Europe. It also grows in Asia.

Description

A bulky bush. The bark is black-brown. It has white flowers and a dark blue fruit.

Medicinal Parts

Berry
Flowers

Historical Properties & Uses

The berries have traditionally been used to make a country wine, often for medicinal purposes.

The syrup and wine are employed as purgative or diuretic and as marmalade for dyspepsia.

The flowers have approval status by the German Commission E for mild inflammatory conditions of the oral and pharyngeal mucosa.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Method of Action

This herb contains tannins that have an astringent action.

Drug Interactions & Precautions

There are no known interactions.

Safety Factors & Toxicity

There are no known contraindications or side effects.

The country wine is often taken for gastrointestinal complaints, in a small dosage. Larger doses of the wine could be expected to cause some gastrointestinal complaints.

Preparation & Administration

The fruit may be edible after several frosts, hence it is usually used for wine.

Preparations are usually in the form of teas or mouth rinses.

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E.

Recommended daily dosages in Germany are as follows:

2 - 4 g of the flowers.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Note: This Herbal Preparation information is a summary of data from books and articles by various authors. It is not intended to replace the advice or attention of health care professionals.

References

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Gruenwald, J, Brendler, T & Jaenicke, C (Eds.): PDR for Herbal Medicines. Medical Economics, NJ. 1998.