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Bugleweed

Bugleweed

Botanical Description / Habitat

Lycopi herba
Lycopus virginicus (homeopathic)

[Also Lycopus Europaeus]

Family

Lamiaceae

Common Names

Bugleweed
Gypsywort
Sweet Bugle
Virginia Water Horehound
Water Bugle

Lycopus Europaeus (a close relative)
        Gypsywort
        Water Horehound

Habitat

Bugleweed (Lycopus virginicus) grows in North America.

Description

An herbaceous perennial with runners producing small flowers.

Medicinal Parts

Consist of the fresh or dried above ground parts.

It is recommended that the European variety be collected just before the buds open.

Historical Properties & Uses

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E for mild thyroid hyperfunction with disturbances of the vegetative nevrous system. Also for mastodynia (breast pain).

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Method of Action

The herb contains hydrocinnaminic and caffeic acid derivatives, lithospermic acid and flavonoids.

Drug Interactions & Precautions

While there are no known interactions, it is advisable not to take this preparation with other thyroid preparations.

It also interferes with diagnostic procedures using radioactive isotopes.

Safety Factors & Toxicity

Bugleweed should not be used when there is thyroid hypofunction (hypothyroidism) or thyroid enlargement.

Extended therapy and high dosages have led to thyroid enlargement (goiter).

Preparation & Administration

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E.

Recommended daily dosages in Germany are as follows:

1 - 2 g herb.

20 mg (herbal equivalent) water-ethanol extracts

Fresh pressed juice may also be used.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Note: This Herbal Preparation information is a summary of data from books and articles by various authors. It is not intended to replace the advice or attention of health care professionals.

References

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Gruenwald, J, Brendler, T & Jaenicke, C (Eds.): PDR for Herbal Medicines. Medical Economics, NJ. 1998.

Hoffmann, D: The New Holistic Herbal. Element, 1983. Third edition 1990.