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Heartsease

Heartsease

Botanical Description / Habitat

Viola tricoloris

Also Viola vulgaris

Family

Violaceae

Common Names

European Wild Pansy
Johnny Jump-up
Pansy
Wild Pansy

Habitat

Hilly pastures and banks throughout Europe and Asia. It is cultivated in Holland and France.

Description

An annual or perennial herb.

The single flower is tricolored: purple, yellow and white but the plant is odorless.

Medicinal Parts

Dried above ground parts harvested at flowering season.

Historical Properties & Uses

Pansy is used primarily for the skin, lungs and urinary tract. It is recommended for "weeping" eczema.

As an anti-inflammatory expectorant, it is used for whooping cough and acute bronchitis.

For urinary problems it will aid in the healing of cystitis and help with symptoms of frequent and painful urination.

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E for external use in mild seborrheic diseases and milk scall in children.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Method of Action

Contains saponins, salicylates, alkaloid, flavonoids, tannin and mucilage.

Drug Interactions & Precautions

There are no known interactions.

Safety Factors & Toxicity

There are no known side effects or contraindications.

Preparation & Administration

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E.

Recommended daily dosages in Germany are as follows:

1.5 g per cup of water as tea t.i.d. [N.B. for external usage.]

A traditional recipe calls for 1 or 2 teaspoons per cup of boiling water.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Note: This Herbal Preparation information is a summary of data from books and articles by various authors. It is not intended to replace the advice or attention of health care professionals.

References

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Gruenwald, J, Brendler, T & Jaenicke, C (Eds.): PDR for Herbal Medicines. Medical Economics, NJ. 1998.

Hoffmann, D: The New Holistic Herbal. Element, 1983. Third edition 1990.

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