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English Ivy

English Ivy

Botanical Description / Habitat

Hedera helix

Family

Myrtaceae

Common Names

English Ivy (in the USA)
Gum Ivy
Ivy
True Ivy

Habitat

Thrives in Britain but grows in other temperate regions of the world.

Description

A familiar creeping, or climbing evergreen perennial. The berry and seeds become black.

Medicinal Parts

Dried leaves.

Historical Properties & Uses

In English folk medicine, Ivy is used internally for liver, spleen and gallbladder disorders and for gout, rheumatism and scrofulosis (ulcer).

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E for catarrh and inflammatory bronchial conditions.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Method of Action

Ivy contains saponins.

Drug Interactions & Precautions

There are no known interactions.

Safety Factors & Toxicity

There are no known side effects or contraindications.

Preparation & Administration

This herb has approval status by the German Commission E.

Average daily dosage in Germany is:

0.3 g herb.

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Note: This Herbal Preparation information is a summary of data from books and articles by various authors. It is not intended to replace the advice or attention of health care professionals.

References

References:

Blumenthal, M (Ed.): The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. American Botanical Council. Austin, TX. 1998.

Gruenwald, J, Brendler, T & Jaenicke, C (Eds.): PDR for Herbal Medicines. Medical Economics, NJ. 1998.