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Feverfew Standardized Extract

Feverfew Standardized Extract

COMMON NAME
Feverfew

LATIN NAME
Tanacetum parthenium

ORIGIN
German, Holland, UK, Israel

PART OF PLANT USED
Leaves

DESCRIPTION
Feverfew was known to the ancient Egyptians and Greeks as a valuable herbal remedy, used as an anti-inflammatory agent, to treat headaches, and as an emmenagogue (promoting menstrual flow). Feverfew is a member of the daisy family, similar to the tansy and chrysanthemum. The herb has become popular with the recent clinical trials showing its effectiveness as a remedy for migraine headaches.

HISTORICAL USES
Inflammations, hot swellings
Migraines, tension headaches
Nausea, vomiting
Vertigo
Arthritis
Depression
Acute fever
Asthma
Menstrual difficulties
As an emmenagogue
As a liver tonic
To aid digestion
To promote restful sleep

ACTIVE PROPERTIES
With its anti-inflammatory activities, Feverfew has also been useful against swellings and arthritis; for relaxing the smooth muscles in the uterus, promoting menstrual flow; and for inhibiting platelet aggregation and excessive blood clotting. As a bitter herb, feverfew has also been useful in stimulating digestion and improving the functioning of the liver.

ACTIVE SUBSTANCES
Sesquiterpene lactones (including parthenolide, chrysan-themonin, chrysartemin A and B, and santamarin), tannins, beta-farnesene, camphor.

PHARMACOLOGY
Feverfew contains the bitter-tasting sesquiterpene lactones of which parthenolide is the most pharmacologically active. Research studies determined that parthenolide, michefuscalide, and chrysanthenyl acetate inhibited the production of prostaglandins. This inhibition of prostaglandins results in reduction in inflammation, decreased secretion of histamine, decreased activation of inflammatory cells and a reduction of fever, from whence the name of the herb. This reduction of prostaglandins and histamines is thought to be part of the reason for the efficacy of feverfew in treating migraines by reducing spasms of blood vessels.

TOXICITY, CAUTIONS & CONTRA-INDICATIONS
No toxicity seen in clinical trials

DIRECTIONS FOR USE
30 mg./day extract. For migraines, needs to be taken for an entire month before effects are noticed.

BIO-ENHANCING AGENTS
skullcap, rosemary leaf

PROCESSING
Leaves are harvested and extracted. The extract is concentrated to arrive at the guaranteed potency.

STANDARD
0.1- 0.5% parthenolide

ANALYSIS STANDARDIZED EXTRACT

AnalysisResult
Total Sesquiterpene Lactones (calculated as Parthenolide)0.13%
Total Sesquiterpene Lactones (calculated in dry extract)0.4%
Ratio plant to extract3
pH5.3
Ash6.2%
Heavy metalsconforms
Microbiologyconforms



SCIENTIFIC REFERENCES
Weiner, M. (1990) Weiner's Herbal. Mill Valley, CA:Quantum Books.

Grieve, M. (1978) A Modern Herbal. Middlesex, UK: Penguin Books.

Heptinstall, S. (1988) Feverfew - An ancient remedy for modern times? J. Royal Soc. Med. 81:373-374.

Bohlmann, F. and Zdero, C. (1982) Sesquiterpene lactones and other constituents from Tanacetum parthenum. Phytochemistry 21:2543.

Makheja, A. and Bailey, J. (1981) The active principle of Feverfew. Lancet 2:1054.

Johnson, E.S. et al. (1985) Efficacy of Feverfew as prophylactic treatment of migraine. Brit. Med. J. 291:569.

Murphy, J.J et al. (1988) Randomised double-blind trial of Feverfew in migraine prevention. The Lancet 2:189.