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Hawthorn Standardized Extract

Hawthorn Standardized Extract

COMMON NAME
Hawthorne, Mayblossom, whitethorn.

LATIN NAME
Crategus oxyacantha

ORIGIN
England, Europe, North America

PART OF PLANT USED
Berries

DESCRIPTION
Hawthorne is a small thorny tree with white or red flowers and berries. Hawthorne is one of the most valuable cardiovascular tonics available.

HISTORICAL USES
Cardiotonic
Angina
Regular heartbeats
Spasms in the arteries (Raynaud's syndrome)
High and low blood pressure
Old age vascular problems
Hypertension
Nervous disorders
Insomnia
Coronary artery and perfusion disorders
Rhythmic disturbances/heart
Aid digestion
Dyspepsia and diarrhea

ACTIVE SUBSTANCES
flavonoid glycosides, saponins, procyanidins, trimethylamine, tannins.

PHARMACOLOGY
The berries are rich in flavonoids which have been shown to dilate peripheral and coronary blood vessels. This action helps alleviate hypertension and high blood pressure and reduce the severity and frequency of angina attacks. Hawthorne also is a rich source of procyanidins which have sedative and antispasmodic effects. The herb has also been shown to act as a cardiotonic, restoring both high and low blood pressure to normal. Hawthorne has been used in treating irregular heartbeats, spasms of the arteries (Raynaud's), and certain nervous disorders, such as insomnia.

TOXICITY, CAUTIONS & CONTRA-INDICATIONS
No known toxicity. May potentiate the action of digitalis.

DIRECTIONS FOR USE
250 mg/ day

BIO-ENHANCING AGENTS
valerian root, motherwort

PROCESSING
Dry, hydroalcoholic extract

STANDARD
2 % vitexin-2"-rhamnoside

ANALYSIS STANDARDIZED EXTRACT

Product: Crategus oxyacantha, Hawthorne Berries
Type Standardized extract
Standardization 2% vitexin-2"-rhamnoside
Color Brown powder
TLC identification of flavonoids complies
pH 4.5-6.0
Ash 7 %
Heavy Metals less than 100 ppm
Residual organic solvents less than 0.2 %
Total aerobic microbial count less than 1000 cfu/g



SCIENTIFIC REFERENCES

Mowrey, D. (1990) Guaranteed Potency Herbs. A Compilation of writings on the subject.

Mowrey, D. (1986) The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine. Cormorant Books.

Rewerski, W and Lewak, S. (1970) Hypotonic and sedative polyphenol and procyanidin extracts from hawthorn. Ger. Offen. 2:145-211.

Ullsperger, R. (1951) Preliminary communication concerning a coronary vessel dilating principle from hawthorn. Pharmazie 6(4):141-144.