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Ziac

Drug Name: Ziac

Drug ID: 102

Nutritional Considerations

  • The use of alcohol should be limited.

    1. Mindell, E, Hopkins V: Prescription Alternatives. New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, Inc, 1998; p. 143.
    2. Facts and Comparisons, Clinisphere 2.0, Wolters Kluwer Company, 2000
    3. Pronsky, Z Food Medication Interactions, 11th edition, 1999
  • Ziac may contribute to deficiencies in Co-Q-10, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and sodium.

    1. Shand, D.G.: Clinical pharmacology of the beta-blocking drugs: implications for the postinfarction patient. Circulation, 1983, 67(Supp 1): 12-15.
    2. Kishi H, Kishi T, Folkers K: Bioenergetics in clinical medicine III--inhibition of coenzyme Q10-enzymes by clinically used antihypertensive drugs, Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol, 1975, 12(3):533-40.
    3. Martin B, Milligan K. Diuretic-associated hypomagnesiumia in the elderly. Arch Intern Med 1987;147:1768-71.
    4. Kroenke K, Wood DR, Hanley JF. The value of serum magnesium determination in hypertensive patients receiving diuretics. Arch Intern Med. 1987;147:1553-56.
    5. Whang R, Whang DD, Ryan MP. Refractory potassium repletion, a consequence of magnesium deficiency. Arch Intern Med 1992;152:40-45.

Herbal Considerations

  • Natural licorice products, Ginseng , Ginkgo, and Ephedra (Ma huang) may interfere with antihypertensive medications and should be avoided with high blood pressure.

    1. Pronsky, ZM: Food-Medication Interactions, 11th edition, 1999
    2. Farese, RV et al., Licorice-induced hypermineralcorticoidism. NEJM. 1991, 325:1,1223-1,227.
    3. Shaw D et al. Traditional remedies and food supplements: a 5-year toxicological study (1991-1995). Drug Safety 1997;17:342-56.
    4. Shintani S, Murase H, Tsukagoshi H, Shiigai T. Glycyrrhizin (licorice)-induced hypokalemic myopathy. Report of two cases and review of the literature. Eur Neurol 1992;32:44-51.
    5. Brinker, F Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions, Eclectic Medical Publications, 1998
  • Some herbs possess diuretic properties that may intensify the action of antihypertensive drugs, which could result in an excessive lowering of blood pressure. Such herbs include: Alfalfa, Angelica, Astragalus, Basil, Bean Pod, Buckthorn, Burdock, Butcher’s Broom, Buchu, Celery, Cleavers, Cornflower, Dandelion, Elecampane, Elder, Goat's Rue, Hempnettle, Horsetail, Indian-Hemp, Juniper, Marigold, Meadowsweet, Parsley, Rauwolfia, Sarsaparilla, Sweet clover, Turmeric, and Vervain

    1. Newall CA, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD. Herbal Medicines A Guide for Health-care Professionals. London: The Pharmaceutical Press, 1996.
    2. Brinker, F Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions, Eclectic Medical Publications, 1998
    3. Shaw D et al. Traditional remedies and food supplements: a 5-year toxicological study (1991-1995). Drug Safety 1997;17:342-56.
    4. PDR for Herbal Medicines, 2nd edition, Medical Economics Company, 2000

NDC Codes

00005323423, 00005323538, 00005323823, 00046323423, 00046323538, 00046323823, 45868417900, 54569470700, 54569470800