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Health Briefs

Collagen Type II for Osteoarthritis

Applied Health Briefs

Applied Health Briefs

Topics of Health and Natural Healing
Issue {14}
ISSN: 1525-6359


Collagen Type II for Arthritis Pain Relief

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Does Collagen Type II relieve osteoarthritis? Research says, yes.

Was that snap, crackle, and pop your knee or mine? What do you turn to for relief - TigerBalm, Aspirin, glucosamine/chondroitin . . . chocolate and a tranquillizer? If you are like most Americans, you may be using two of the most popular forms of arthritis supplements - glucosamine and chondroitin. Approximately, $810 million was spent on these nutrients in 2005. Glucosamine and chondroitin can provide relief, but researchers are finding another nutrient may have more superior benefits in restoring joint health.

 Full article here


 

 

 

Blue-Green Algae Boosts Energy and Athletic Performance

Applied Health Briefs

Applied Health Briefs

Topics of Health and Natural Healing
Issue {12}
ISSN: 1525-6359


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Blue-Green Algae Boosts Energy and Athletic Performance

-- Did you take your algae today? This may be a funny thing to ask a friend, but research finds a good dose of this micronutrient can sustain energy and improve athletic performance. Who doesn’t want to make it through the day with continuous energy?

A four-week study recruited male athletes to take spirulina, a form of blue-green algae, or a placebo. After running for two hours on a treadmill at a high-level of intensity, exercise performance and respiratory quotient were measured. Blood samples were also take an hour after exercise, followed by 24 and 48 hour samples to determine glutathione, catalase activity, and antioxidant capacity.

Researchers found that subjects taking a spirulina supplement had greater exercise endurance, as they fatigued slower. These subjects had a 10.3% decrease in carbohydrate oxidation and 10.9% increase in fat oxidation. In other words, subjects burned more fat.

Overall, it was concluded that athletes taking spirulina had a significant improvement in exercise performance, burned more fat, and a greater concentration of glutathione (the body’s essential antioxidant for healing and regenerating cells). Instead of guzzling an energy drink, try boosting your exercise routine and energy with a good dose of blue-green algae.

References:

Kalafati M, Jamurtas AZ, Nikolaidis MG, Paschalis V, et al. Ergogenic and antioxidant effects of spirulina supplementation in humans. Med & Science in Sports & Exercise. 2010 Jan. 42(1):142-151.

For a complete list of past and current Health Briefs,
visit Applied Health Brief Archives.


Copyright © {2010} Applied Health Solutions, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona
All rights reserved. www.appliedhealth.com 480.998.0992

 

Calcium 101

Applied Health Briefs

Applied Health Briefs

Topics of Health and Natural Healing
Issue {13}
ISSN: 1525-6359


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Calcium: How Much, What Form

What is the most abundant mineral in the body? Though it may be marketed as “it does a body good” or included in fortified orange juice, many people still struggle to obtain adequate amounts of calcium that are essential to strong bones and various metabolic functions. With so many calcium supplements on the market, consumers often feel clueless on what form is best. Even more complicated, is the fact that calcium cannot work alone. It requires other essential minerals (vitamin D and magnesium) to assimilate properly in the body. Calcium’s benefits are vital to a strong skeletal system, as 99% of the body’s calcium is found in the bones and teeth.  The remaining 1% is also important to healthy muscle contractions, weight management, balanced blood pressure, hormone and enzyme production, and so much more. 

 

Full article here:

 

   

High-Sodium Diet Linked to Cancer

Applied Health Briefs

Applied Health Briefs

Topics of Health and Natural Healing
Issue {11}
ISSN: 1525-6359


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Can Salt Cause Cancer?

-- You may realize a high-sodium diet can increase your risk of high blood pressure and heart disease, but there is also new evidence linking salty foods to cancer.

Do you know how much salt you consume each day? The World Health Organization recommends an intake of 5 grams of sodium each day; however, average daily consumption can be from 10 to 12 grams. Over 80% of sodium intake comes from processed foods, in which many do not recognize how much salt they are actually consuming.

Along with cardiovascular risks, a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that salted foods can increase cancer risks. Researchers in Japan recruited approximately 80,000 men and women (aged 45 to 74) to determine the frequency of sodium intake with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer.

After a three-year follow-up, 4,476 cases of cancer and 2,066 cases of heart disease were reported. Heart disease risks were 19% higher among subjects that consumed 17 grams of salt (the highest intake), when compared to subjects consuming 7 grams of salt (the lowest intake). While sodium and salt were not linked to cancer, the consumption of salted foods (dried fish, pickled vegetables, fish roe, etc.) did increase cancer risks, specifically colon, gastric, and lung cancer.

A possible factor in this increase is the presence of nitrate and nitrite preservatives in salted foods. Overall, high sodium intake can be detrimental to your heart and overall health. It is best to choose unprocessed foods and read labels to know exactly what you are consuming.

References:

Takachi R, Inoue M, Shimazu T, Sasazuki S, et al. Consumption of sodium and salted foods in relation to cancer and cardiovascular disease: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. Amer J of Clinical Nutr. 2010;91:456-464.

For a complete list of past and current Health Briefs,
visit Applied Health Brief Archives.


Copyright © {2010} Applied Health Solutions, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona
All rights reserved. www.appliedhealth.com 480.998.0992

 

Grapefruit Juice to Increase CoQ10

Applied Health Briefs

Applied Health Briefs

Topics of Health and Natural Healing
Issue {10}
ISSN: 1525-6359


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Can Grapefruit Juice Improve CoQ10 Absorption?

-- CoQ10 is an important antioxidant that is naturally found in the body. It is essential to high-energy organs, like the heart, brain and liver, in producing energy for the cells. Many individuals take a CoQ10 supplement, as its natural production decreases with age (dramatically drops at age 40). Taking a CoQ10 supplement can support physical energy, protect your heart, and sustain neurological function.

In order to absorb, CoQ10 needs the presence of lipids (fats), which is why CoQ10 should be taken with a meal, or at least combined with a carrying agent, such as vitamin E. However, a new study finds a well-known citrus may also aid CoQ10 absorption. A study published in Food Chemistry found that grapefruit juice can improve CoQ10 absorption in the intestines by 50%. Grapefruit juice has certain compounds that inhibit P-glycoprotein production, which will increase CoQ10 absorption.

It is not all good news for grapefruits, though.  Grapefruit juice has been proven to interact with prescription drugs, including statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs), even though it has beneficial properties for increasing circulating levels of CoQ10 in the blood. Grapefruit juice blocks certain enzymes that metabolize many drugs. This increases the circulating blood levels of some prescription drugs to toxic levels.  If you are on some prescription drugs, be aware of the potential risks before consuming grapefruits.

(ed. note: Anyone on statin drugs should be informed about the need for increased supplementation of CoQ10.  However, they should also be aware that grapefruits should be avoided.  For more information about these issues -- and others -- visit the YoMax database to look up the specific drug.  A link to one of the more common statin drugs (Zocor) is listed here for a convenient reference: YoMax: Zocor Awareness.)

References:

Cooke, M, Iosia, M, Buford, T, et al. Effects of acute and 14-day coenzyme Q10 supplementation on exercise performance in both trained and untrained individuals. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2008 Mar;5:8.

Rosenfeldt, F. et al. Systematic review of effect of coenzyme Q10 in physical exercise, hypertension and heart failure. Biofactors. 2003; 18(1-4):91-100.

Shults, CW, Oakes, D, Kieburtz, K, et al. Effects of coenzyme Q10 in early Parkinson disease: evidence of slowing of the functional decline. Arch Neurol. 2002; 59(10):1541-1550.

Itagaki S, Ochiai A, Kobayashi M, Sugawara M, et al. Grapefruit juice enhances the uptake of coenzyme Q10 in the human intestinal cell-line Caco-2. Food Chemistry, 2010;120:552-555.

For a complete list of past and current Health Briefs,
visit Applied Health Brief Archives.


Copyright © {2010} Applied Health Solutions, Inc., Scottsdale, Arizona
All rights reserved. www.appliedhealth.com 480.998.0992

   

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